Friday, June 15, 2018

Futurist Perception

A few decades ago a colleague had business cards made for each member of our writers group; each card had some words referring to that person's interests. On mine he put "Historian and Futurist" (I still have the cards). It seems quite a dichotomy, and I found it amusing. My published books, at that point in time, had been historical fiction, but he knew I was reading, absorbing and wanting to write science fiction. Now I've published science fiction, but to me, the futurist tag still didn't fit--until that past few years when I'd read traces of things I'd imagined in physics and neuroscience books.
One of my favorite authors, David Brin, is an affirmed futurist. Concepts and science happenings he wrote about in the ’80s are now coming to be or being proved. Christian Cantrell, is one of many young authors who have published books with some projected techno possibilities that have now become realities. My scientific background is minimal, so I sketchily created future technology on some standard foundations others had developed; I've always felt that my science fiction has dealt more with future social possibilities and conundrums than with any hard science.
Imagine my surprise when I watched a new episode of "Through the Wormhole" on the Science Channel and scientists told about a probable gene-mod future that would alter/advance the human mind and could lead to a world of Super Humans. It wasn't the Super Human part that rang my bell, but the gene modification references. In my first science fiction book, Daughter of the Stone, the people have had their DNA altered so that they have selective, perfect memories and abilities. It had been a project of another species who intended the humans to be a working class, and their intended jobs were programmed into their system to be passed down from generation to generation (through bio-nanotech) to alleviate the need of extensive training and education. The current gene-mod references given in the TV show, matched my imagined occurrence quite closely. (I veered from the science end to the social aspect, focusing the story on the problems when the "slaves" became autonomous.)
So with a tad of perception about a could-be future, I now feel comfortable calling myself a Futurist.

No comments:

Post a Comment